Coast Guard Responding to Leaking Gas Well 44 miles from Louisiana Coast

July 10, 2013: Leaking Ship Shoals Block 225 – Platform B photographed by Billy Dugger via an On Wings of Care flight with Pilot Bonny Schumaker. 
See more photos at – OnWingsOfCare.org
 
UPDATED: July 11, 2013 at 9:58 am with photo from On Wings of Care
 
July 10, 2013 – 3:40 pm: The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement announced Tuesday they are responding to a loss of well control at Platform B in Ship Shoal Block 225. On July 9, USCG reported a 4-mile by 3/4 mile rainbow sheen in the Gulf (covering an area of 1,920 acres based on reported dimensions) around an oil and natural gas platform 79 miles southwest of Port Fourchon, Louisiana and 44 miles from the nearest land. According to a statement by the well owners, the incident occurred at an older well that was being plugged and abandoned, and the other two producing wells on the platform have been shut-in. CNN reports the wellhead is located on the Gulf floor at a depth of 130 feet, and quoted Jonathan Henderson of Gulf Restoration Network (one of our partners in the Gulf Monitoring Consortium) on the potential environmental impact of this leak.
“Toxic gases will damage the bodies of fish that come into contact by damaging their gills and causing internal damage … Marine species in the Gulf are more vulnerable when water temperatures are high and when oxygen concentrations are low like they are now.”
Energy Resource Technology (ERT) Gulf of Mexico LCC, the platform’s operators, first reported trouble with the well to the USCG’s National Response Center (NRC) on July 7th, disclosing that at 4:45 pm local time ”CRUDE OIL WAS RELEASED THROUGH HOLES IN THE HOSE” as they were cleaning out a well with “coil tubing.” The caller estimated the resulting a sheen was 750 feet wide by 1 mile long (90.9 acres). That same day the NRC received a call from the same area reporting a 1 mile by 4 mile ( 2,560 acres) oil slick from “AN UNSECURED WELL HEAD THAT HAS RELEASED THREE BARRELS OF OIL INTO THE WATER.”
The following day, on July 8th, ERT again reported that at 7:00 am they had spilled 4.2 gallons of crude oil “DUE TO EQUIPMENT FAILURE WHILE PLUGGING THE WELL.” The caller reporting the spill estimated the sheen was 450 feet wide by 0.3 miles long (16.36 acres).
At 6:45 am on July 9th, a passing aircraft reported a much larger sheen to the NRC – 200 feet wide by 5 miles long (121.2 acres).
As of July 9, the most recent reports from USCG state that platform personnel had been evacuated and federal agencies are monitoring well-control and pollution response activities. Gulf Monitoring Consortium member SkyTruth reports that cloud cover in the Gulf has impeded observation by satellite, but will continue to monitor reports and available satellite imagery.
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This report will be updated as needed with new information and images.
1 reply
  1. John Amos says:

    We have a bone to pick with the Coast Guard. They need to brush up on oilfield terminology. From an AP article today: "The well did not blow out and there was no explosion or fire on the platform, Coast Guard Lt. Lily Zepeda said." But most oil industry dictionaries and glossaries define "blowout" as "an uncontrolled flow of gas, oil, or other well fluids from the well." Which this obviously is. https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/oilandgas/glossary_of_terms/glossary_of_terms_b.html

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